A third of Brits would transfer money to phone-line fraudsters

One in three people would unwittingly transfer money to an unknown account if they were telephoned by someone posing as their bank according to new research from Nationwide Building Society. This is despite more than two thirds (67%) of people worrying about becoming a victim of fraud.

The poll was conducted as part of the Society’s ongoing campaign to help people protect themselves from the growing threat of fraud. Despite criminals employing increasingly more sophisticated techniques to dupe their victims, there are a number of simple precautions and steps people can take to avoid becoming another statistic.

The research of 2,000 UK adults, shows that around a third of Brits (31%) could potentially become victims of vishing by stating that they would transfer their money to another account if they were called by someone purporting to be from a trusted organisation, such as their bank, building society or the police. Criminals often use this tactic, requesting their unsuspecting victims to transfer money into a ‘safe’ account due to suspected fraud.

Despite the terms and conditions of current accounts telling people not to share their PIN with anyone, half (50%) have disclosed their PIN to their partner. However, around one in 15 would share their PIN with their bank or building society (7%) or the police (6%). While no legitimate bank or building society employee or police officer would ask for this information, fraudsters often pretend to be from these organisations as a way of coercing the information out of their victims.

The poll also reveals that while older people may be seen as an easy target, younger generations are twice as likely to be caught out in a scam. More than half (52%) of those aged 18 to 24 would transfer their money to another account if they were convinced that either the police, their bank or their building society was asking them to do so, compared to just one in five (22%) aged 55 and over.

Equally, a fifth (20%) of 18 to 24 year-olds would share their PIN with their bank or building society and one in six (16%) would share the same information with the police. By comparison, just one in fifteen (6%) and less than one in 20 (4%) of those aged 55 and over would be willing to share the same information.

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